Podcasts about books – Bondi’s Brother

A popular podcast format these days: interview guests with recently released books. Most of my favorite podcasts use this method and they come up with amazing guests. Everytime.

Added to that, the hosts of these popular podcasts have well developed interview skills aided by talent for connection with insightful questions.

There are five or six regulars on my watch list and Eric Metaxas Radio Show is one of them. (I know, it says Radio Show but it actually shows up on YouTube as a podcast. That confused me for awhile too.)

Earlier this week Eric interviewed an amazing man about the memoir he’s written outlining his experiences as a teen during World War II. A subject high on my radar since my early twenties. This interview and book built on all of the information I’ve taken in over the years and it was amazing to hear a man speak about living through things I have only read about.

It’s good to hear a first hand account and be reminded it would not be outrageous to think such a terrible thing could happen in the world again… if we are not careful.

The overriding motive behind WWII was a terrible thirst for power. The lethargy and lack of concern among the citizenry of the world allowed the power hungry to seize opportunities and even to invent opportunities, with little resistance.

Our world is experiencing power struggles once again. God forbid that our citizenry would allow it to happen a second time. How could we ever live through it, if it were to get that far again?

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The book featured in this podcast – author Irving Roth

Bondi’s Brother: A Story of Love, Loss, Betrayal and Liberation

Amazon quote:

The Roth family lived in Slovakia, had a prosperous business and two young sons, Irving and his older brother Bondi. Irving’s earliest memories are of the Catholic maid who was like a mother to him. Soon though, all that changed as laws made it illegal for a non-Jew to work for a Jew. His father was also forced to sell his business and the whole family had to wear Star-of-David yellow patches on their clothes. The family fled to Hungary and the boys sent to a boarding school. Later, the two boys were picked up, put on a cattle car and sent to a concentration camp.

All the horrors of the camp are described in excruciating detail – the hunger, the hard work, the constant fear. Always though the boys had each other until after a couple of years they were separated.

In spite of these hardships, Irving survived. Perhaps it was because he was only 15 years old, young enough and strong enough to somehow make it through. Liberation though was bitter-sweet because he never saw his brother again.

The book makes the horror very real. And it’s hard to believe how bad it really was. However it’s also a testament to the positive human spirit and the will to live. I will never forget this book. It will haunt my memories for a long time. Yes, the specific time and place have dissolved into history. But its legacy lives on and teaches the lesson that we should never take our easy lives for granted and we should appreciate what we have. – Linda Linguvic

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Eric Metaxas podcast interview of Irving Roth

A must watch, we could easily find ourselves here again.

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It’s good to be reminded of the evil in the world. We don’t want to be caught unaware like the proverbial frog in the pot of hot water.

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